Segunda-feira, 5 de Abril de 2010

On quotation

 

It is tempting to quote authors when they express our very own thoughts but with a clarity and psychological accuracy we cannot match. They know us better than we know ourselves. What is shy and confused in us is succinctly and elegantly phrased in them, our pencil lines and annotations in the margins of their books and our borrowings from them indicating where we find a piece of ourselves, a sentence or two built of the very substance of which our own minds are made - a congruence all the more striking if the work was written in an age of togas and animal sacrifices. We invite these words into our books as a homage for reminding us of who we are. But rather than illuminating our experiences and goading us on to our own discoveries, great books may come to cast a problematic shadow. They may lead us to dismiss aspects of our lives of which there is no printed testimony. Far from expanding our horizons, they may unjustly come to mark their limits.Montaigne knew one man who seemed to have bought his bibliophilia too dearly:

 

 

 

Whenever I ask [this] acquaintance of mine to tell me what he knows about something, he wants to show me a book: he would not venture to tell me that he has scabs on his arse without studying his lexicon to find out the meanings of scab and arse.

 

 

Such reluctance to trust our own, extra-literary, experiences might not be grievous if books could be relied upon to express all our potentialities, if they knew all our scabs. But as Montaigne recognized, the great books are silent on too many themes, so that if we allow them to define the boundaries of our curiosity, they will hold back the development of our minds.

[…] However modest our stories, we can derive greater insights from ourselves than from all the books of old:

 

 

Were I a good scholar, I would find enough in my own experience to make me wise. Whoever recalls to mind his last bout of anger... sees the ugliness of this passion better than in Aristotle. Anyone who recalls the ills he has undergone, those which have threatened him and the trivial incidents which have moved him from one condition to another, makes himself thereby ready for future mutations and the exploring of his condition. Even the life of Caesar is less exemplary for us than our own; a life whether imperial or plebeian is always a life affected by everything that can happen to a man.

 

[…] There is no need to be discouraged if, from the outside, we look nothing like those who have ruminated in the past. In Montaigne's redrawn portrait of the adequate, semi-rational human being, it is possible to speak no Greek, fart, change one's mind after a meal, get bored with books, know none of the ancient philosophers and mistake Scipios.

 

A virtuous, ordinary life, striving for wisdom but never far from folly, is achievement enough.

 

 

 

 

 

Alain De Botton

in The Consolations of Philosophy (Consolation for Inadequacy) pp.161-168

© Alain De Botton, 2000

 

 

 

em português aqui

 

 

publicado por VF às 14:47
link do post | comentar | favorito

pesquisar

mais sobre mim

posts recentes

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

O Bloco-Notas de José Cut...

tags

todas as tags

links

arquivos

Maio 2018

Abril 2018

Março 2018

Fevereiro 2018

Janeiro 2018

Dezembro 2017

Novembro 2017

Outubro 2017

Setembro 2017

Agosto 2017

Julho 2017

Junho 2017

Maio 2017

Abril 2017

Março 2017

Fevereiro 2017

Janeiro 2017

Dezembro 2016

Novembro 2016

Outubro 2016

Setembro 2016

Agosto 2016

Julho 2016

Junho 2016

Maio 2016

Abril 2016

Março 2016

Fevereiro 2016

Janeiro 2016

Dezembro 2015

Novembro 2015

Outubro 2015

Setembro 2015

Agosto 2015

Julho 2015

Junho 2015

Maio 2015

Abril 2015

Março 2015

Fevereiro 2015

Janeiro 2015

Dezembro 2014

Novembro 2014

Outubro 2014

Setembro 2014

Agosto 2014

Julho 2014

Junho 2014

Maio 2014

Abril 2014

Março 2014

Fevereiro 2014

Janeiro 2014

Dezembro 2013

Novembro 2013

Outubro 2013

Setembro 2013

Agosto 2013

Julho 2013

Junho 2013

Maio 2013

Abril 2013

Março 2013

Fevereiro 2013

Janeiro 2013

Dezembro 2012

Novembro 2012

Outubro 2012

Setembro 2012

Agosto 2012

Julho 2012

Junho 2012

Maio 2012

Abril 2012

Março 2012

Fevereiro 2012

Janeiro 2012

Dezembro 2011

Novembro 2011

Outubro 2011

Setembro 2011

Agosto 2011

Julho 2011

Junho 2011

Maio 2011

Abril 2011

Março 2011

Fevereiro 2011

Janeiro 2011

Dezembro 2010

Novembro 2010

Outubro 2010

Setembro 2010

Agosto 2010

Julho 2010

Junho 2010

Maio 2010

Abril 2010

Março 2010

Fevereiro 2010

Janeiro 2010

Dezembro 2009

Novembro 2009

Outubro 2009

Setembro 2009

Agosto 2009

Julho 2009

Junho 2009

Maio 2009

Abril 2009

Março 2009

Fevereiro 2009

Janeiro 2009

Dezembro 2008

Novembro 2008

Creative Commons License
This work by //retrovisor.blogs.sapo.pt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Blogs Portugal

blogs SAPO

subscrever feeds